Skip to main content

#AtoZChallenge - P is for Periodicals, Podcasts, Preserving and Publishing


You could say that I have covered Periodicals already under J for journals.

However, while I've been compiling these posts, I have also been walking the dog every morning and listening to some Podcasts.

What podcasts do I listen to?  Anything and everything really but you might be interested in the following genealogy podcasts....

Genealogy Guys

Genies Down Under

Genealogy Gems

The National Archives

Anyways, I was listening to the Genealogy Guys and I kept hearing them mention the PERSI Index on Find My Past.  It's amazing what you don't know about tools that you use on a regular basis.  So I will mention it now for what it is worth.  You can access the PERSI index on Find My Past!!!  You can search it here. You can read about what it is here on the lovely Family Search wiki.

If you have invested in resources for your genealogy library be they books, CDs, certificates...whatever you are probably interested in Preserving them or at least looking after them for posterity.

State Library of Queensland's website has some easy to read guides here. Whether you want to know how to choose shelving, handle books, preserve your digital content or deal with an emergency, there's a guide to help you.

Library of Congress has the most beautiful bookmarks to remind you how to preserve your family treasures here.

I have, of course, invested in some books as well.  I think I have already mentioned Shauna Hicks Your Family History Archives.  And I also have a copy of Stopping the rot: a handbook of preventive conservation for local studies collections by Helen Price.

Publishing 
This could as easily come under W for Writing but I think it is worth mentioning that at some stage you might also be interested in writing and publishing your own family history. Whether you choose to self-publish online through a blog or in a hard copy there are many publications to help you.  We've probably all got some books on writing/publishing on our shelves.  I have Peter Donovan's - So, You Want to Write History ? and Joanna Beaumont's How to Write and Publish your Family history.  Noeline Kyle is also very popular in this area. I have recently invested in Blogging for Dummies, just to make sure I've got the basics covered and I am very impressed with Ros Petelin's How Writing works: a field guide to effective writing which I think I am going to have to purchase.

Have you any pronouncements or pearls of wisdom you would like to share with the family history community in this regard ?

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

How to knock down a brick wall

I've been researching family history for a very long time...a very long time.  Let me say that again....a very long time.  So you think I'd know better but....we all get into habits and routines.  We all think we know how to do research. 

So, let me tell you a story about what happened to me the other day.  The other night actually.  Wednesday night specifically.

Wednesday night had been looming large in my consciousness because it was when my final assignment was due for the Writing Family History unit I'm studying at University of Tasmania (yes - even though I live all the way up in Queensland - don't you love modern technology?) The assignment was due at midnight.

So anyway, I'd decided to write about my two great-great-aunts Clara Rebecca Conner and Harriet Conner because I am obsessed with them.  During the course I had written a couple of short stories about them.  




No that's not a photo of my aunts.  Aunt Fossie (someone else's aunt) is on the right appa…

Sepia Saturday 407: 24 February 2018

This shows Ida Zornig along with her bicycle and - very well behaved - dog (from the State Library of Queensland's Flickr stream). Sepians are well known for being very well behaved and therefore they will undoubtedly come up with something inventive and interesting in response to this prompt. Whatever you come up with, post your post on or around Saturday 24th February 2018 and add a link here.
One could not say that I am a big bike rider.  All right, I'll be honest, I don't possess a bike at all at the moment.  However, I have many pleasant memories of owning a bike or riding a bike at different stages of my life.  As a child, it was a means of freedom and adventure, riding around the suburbs or by the lake in Canberra.  As a young adult, for a while there, I would ride a bike from Taringa to work at Toowong (not a great distance I know) and sometimes at lunchtime, I would ride with my colleagues into town and back again for fun.  Once the kids came along, there were lots…

Sepia Saturday 408: 3rd March 2018

This week's Sepia Saturday prompt photo is a Caddy Master and his caddies at the Shaughnessy Golf Club and is from the Flickr Commons stream of the Vancouver Public Library Historical Photograph Collection.

When I "googled" golf AND caddy on Trove one of the photos that came up was this one.

Isn't it a beauty?


I would love to post the photos here on my blog but even though the copyright status indicates that it is out of copyright, under the terms of use it states that restrictions on publication apply.  Reading the Fairfax site it suggests that if I want to use the photos on social media (not advertising), Fairfax would charge $157 per photo to do so.  Sigh.

I just love the photo of Mrs Triglone and her caddy for so many reasons.  I love that she and the caddy are essentially the same height.  I love the caddy's grin.  

I wanted to find out some more about Mrs Triglone.  

I discovered from this article that she was originally Miss Duret.





She married Arthur Harcourt Tri…