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Australia Day 2021

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I acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and their continuing connection to land, culture and community. I pay my respect to Elders past, present and emerging. Australia Day is a conflicted experience in our country - for many, it is the reminder of what has been stolen.  You may as well say "Happy Invasion Day".   Have you completed the ABC Australia Day quiz yet?  I did not get a very good result at all, no sirree.  I think I only got about 3 answers right.  I knew that the first protest about Australia Day was back in 1938; something I learned only recently.  I knew when the Aboriginal Tent Embassy was set up in Canberra; having grown up in Canberra and being old enough to remember made it easy. And I  knew that India celebrated a public holiday on the same day.  But I only learned that this morning on social media because of a comment someone made on someone else's blog post.   So what kind of blog do you write on a day filled with so

Sepia Saturday 552 : Saturday 9th January 2021

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  Alan from Sepia Saturday says: To take us into 2021 we have the letter T. You can interpret this as you like, for our theme image I have chosen a Birmingham tram from the 1920s. All you have to do is to feature an old photo in a blog post, post the post on or around Saturday 9th January 2021, and add a link to the list below. I have chosen a few bits and bobs from a memento box which needs to be sorted and scanned; something on my list of never-ending things to do which never seem to get done. Hazel Teddy & Jim at The Gap Watson's Bay   I don't think I've posted this photo before.  I like this photo because it shows Ted as a young boy.  Most of the photos I have of Ted are when he is an adult or a teen. As my father is the baby in this photo, I reckon Ted was probably about 10 years old and Hazel, 12-14 years old. Jim, my father, seems to have lost his shoe.  Why would they have been at Watson's Bay I wonder?  Had Jim just been baptised?  No. He was baptised at

Amenuensis Monday

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  How are you going with your family history research in this new year?  An area which is often difficult to research is that of our female ancestors.  We are also reminded how quickly memories or information about our ancestors, even relatively close ones, is lost.  For example how much do you really know about your grandparents' lives?  Are they still alive?  Did you record any interviews with them?  What evidence do you have?  And your parents?  You think you are pretty familiar with their lives but are you really?   I am fortunate that my mother was a great letter-writer and gave me many of her letters before she died.  They are all in manilla folders and marked with the year.  They range from 1959 up to 1992.  My mother died in 1995.  Much of the correspondence is with her father, her cousin, an old flatmate, and friends.  My mother was an only child so friends were very important to her.  Some of those friends are alive today and much of the information contained therein is o

Sepia Saturday 551 : Christmas & New Year 2020

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  Alan from Sepia Saturday says,  So here it is - Merry Christmas. S in the Sepia Saturday alphabet takes us to Seasonal Greetings ... and Powers of Waterford for Seeds and Trees. This is our Christmas and New Year prompt for 2020, so you can add your contributions at any time over the next couple of weeks. Short and sweet from me today. Here's a great photo from State Library of Queensland's collection  Christmas celebrations in Cribb Island, December 1928. A community Christmas tree, strewn with toys and gifts, is mounted on top of a cart. One of the residents of Cribb Island is dressed up as Santa Claus. Available online at https://hdl.handle.net/10462/deriv/108347 Out of copyright.  State Library of Queensland At first glance, I thought this was a very odd picture.  What were all these adults doing under a very odd Christmas tree? Then, when I looked closer, I realised that it is the equivalent of our modern-day Men's Sheds.  I play bridge at the Kenmore Bridge Club whi

Funeral Friday - Walter Richard (Dick) Hinde

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Today marks the 89th anniversary of Walter Hinde's death.  Walter Hinde was my husband's great-grandfather.   He was born in Brisbane on 22 August 1875 in Arthur Street Fortitude Valley.  His mother was Emma LORD and, while he took the surname of George HINDE, Emma and George did not marry until 1878. Identifying Walter's father is one of our BRICKWALLS! :) George Hinde had come out to Queensland with his brother James on the Derbyshire in July 1874.  The Hindes were from Olney in Buckinghamshire, as were the Lords. To find out more about the Lords and their pub-owning in Olney go here. I have an account of the Hinde brothers from Jess Zimmerman which was passed on to me from other descendants. This is a small extract: "My father, James Hinde and brother George were born in the town of Olney in Buckinghamshire, England.  They decided to emigrate to Australia hearing of plenty of gold here.  They arrived in Brisbane by a sailing ship "Derbyshire" on 15th July

Accentuate the Positive Geneameme 2020

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It's my favourite time of the year when I get to reflect back on what I've done over the past 12 months - in a good or positive way - thanks to geneabuddy GeniAus. Wanna join me?  Copy and paste the relevant items below and then email Jill or comment on her blog post here to let her know you're participating too. So here goes me.... Accentuate the Positive ! (Please delete the items that are not relevant to your situation.) 1.  An elusive ancestor I found was barp on this one I'm afraid.  Who are my elusive ancestors?  Well I guess Margaret Jones from Caernarvonshire, Wales (can I actually find her and her family in Wales?) and Robert Forfar from St Ninian's, Stirling, Scotland (where did he die?).  On my husband's side of the family we would be delighted if we could find the burial place for Robert James Daw born in Brisbane in 1873.  I suspect we will never find him as he was on the run from the law.  Last heard of at Augathella.  I am reading The Power of Bo

Folio Friday - Family History as Therapy?

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  It's Folio Friday and time to share what books we've been reading. I have so many books on the go at the moment, it is embarrassing.  A couple of Inter-Library loans too which I really need to get on with reading. This week's book review is about an Australian book (at last) called The Other Side of Absence by Betty O'Neill published this year by Impact Press, an imprint of Ventura Press. One of the themes that run through both my family history and that of my husband's family history is that of abandonment: children being abandoned by their parents in orphanages or foster homes or similar.  I have often wondered about the psychological damage that is passed down from generation to generation as a result and or the social outcomes for the children.  If I had the intestinal fortitude for undertaking any more university study, this is the area to which I would devote a thesis.  Betty O'Neill has taken on this subject and dealt with it most engagingly and sensit