Saturday, September 28, 2013

Sepia Saturday 196: 28 Sept 2013



Little Nell says:


This week's prompt comes from the George Eastman House Collection on Flickr.com. in the set of Nickolas Muray. Regular Sepians who click on the link of his name will immediately recognise images of his that have been featured before. Yes I know they're anything but sepia and for that alone they are remarkable. Muray was a pioneering commercial photographer, responsible for establishing many of the conventions of colour advertising. This example is for an insurance advert and those Sepians who like to theme may choose from any number of prompts here. The photo appears to have been taken by the doctor, who has left his coat draped on the bedposts and his bag on the bed itself, thus ensuring that any bacteria is neatly carried on to his next patient. In addition we have a boy in bed, toys and patchwork quilt. If the prompt throws up (sorry) any other themes we look forward to reading them on your blog, which should be posted on or about 28 September. I've put a mini-banner at the foot of this post and it's virus-free - as far as I know and an injection of humour should cure it anyway.


Robert's boat 2013

When I first saw the prompt picture chosen for Sepia Saturday, I could not believe it was from 1935.  It was so clear and the furniture, to my eyes, looked contemporary in an "Early Settler Recollections" shop kind of way.  


We all notice different things when we look at photos.  I was taken with the boat the little boy was holding and the one on the bedspread or counterpane.  It reminded me of the one my husband's mother gave him a few years ago when she was tidying up.  "Here's your boat Robert - you can look after it now."  



I asked him this morning what it was and who had made it.  He told me that he had made it and painted it with marine lead paint.  "Does it float?" I asked.  "Yes, but not very well" was the response.  "Did you float it in the bath?" I asked.  "No, in Roger Wolff's pool" was the reply.  Roger and Robert were thick as thieves in his youth, I understand.  I wonder whatever became of Roger Wolff.



I was put in mind of other boats and other boys....



Model boat on Cook's River

Model boat

Sailing on Cook's River c1949


Not very good photos to be sure but the only ones we have.  


My father's brother Ted used to make model boats.  

I have spoken about it before here on my other blog.  Here's an extract from a letter to the RAAF where he talks about it....


Extract of letter to RAAF 13 December 1946


The Cooks River was not very far from where the Conners used to live when the boys were growing up. It must have been heaven - mucking about with model boats.

If you really like model boats and want to see some more semi-sepia photos, go to Trove and thence to Pictorial Canterbury for more recent photos.





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Beds.

How many have you slept in?

Sleepovers, hotels, holiday houses, rental properties, mates' places....

I've slept in a few...


Alex in Master Bedroom Edinburgh

Alex mucking up the bed in Edinburgh


I have no memory of that bedroom in Edinburgh....

but was delighted to find tiny photos of it recently in my father's collection.

This is the bedroom from my childhood at 3 Nungara Street Aranda.






A typical girl's bedroom I'm afraid.

Dolls everywhere from my Gran who went on lots of overseas trips.

Oh and books.

I remember fondly many poems about beds and voyages in beds from the book pictured below.





The Land of Counterpane.





I have strong memories of these pictures/poems too....

A Good Boy








And best of all....

My Bed is a Boat





Do you remember these poems?

I hope you sleep well tonight with a toy or two and perhaps a slice of cake.

Hmm....I'd better go and make my bed...the day is getting away from me...

Sail away and visit other beds, won't you?  

Sweet dreams.


30 comments:

Kristin said...

Your post made me remember the little boats my cousins and sister and I used to hammer together from leftover pieces of wood in my grandfather's basement. Nothing so fancy as your husband's boat. Ours didn't float so well either.

Jackie van Bergen said...

Your bedroom was so similar to mine - a grandma who travelled and brought back lots of different dolls, and the other who gave me lots of books.
Oh and did your uncle get to fly again?

Rosie said...

Enjoyed your post! Like posts with music in them too!

Little Nell said...

Good old RLS, he knew how to paint a picture with words, so that we hardly need an illustration, but the Wildsmith one is a treasure in itself. I'm full of admiration for your tidy childhood bedroom.

boundforoz said...

What lovely memories.

Jackie Mc Guinness said...

Great post on this week's theme!

Sean Bentley said...

Stevenson's poems affect me way more now than they did as a child - they're really for wistful adults! ...I grew up in Seattle, so every summer the kids made primitive wooden hydroplanes during Seafair and raced them, dragging them on string behind their bikes.

Karen S. said...

What an interesting question, how many beds have you slept in, and one that would be quite hard to pin down right away. What with all the many sleepovers even for me back in the day, or when my folks to us to their friend's house and put us to be before we went home. Wow, great question. That little boat is a treasure indeed. I can't believe that I wasn't already following you either, but my new style of reading this week I am discovering who needs to be added!

Alex Daw said...

I love how our posts jog each other's memories :)

Alex Daw said...

My uncle did get to fly again but it wasn't a very happy ending I'm afraid.

Alex Daw said...

Thanks Rosie. I just wish we didn't have to watch the ads with the music!

Alex Daw said...

Thanks Little Nell!

Alex Daw said...

Indeed!

Alex Daw said...

Thanks!

Alex Daw said...

You are so right! I did become quite wistful reading those poems. Liked your memory of racing the hydroplanes :)

Alex Daw said...

Ooh! A new follower! Thanks Karen :)

Postcardy said...

I like the illustrations in your book, but it seems strange since I think of the poems as having more old-fashioned illustrations.

Alex Daw said...

Yes, re-reading some of the poems makes me realise how "old-fashioned" they are now - we were giggling over some of the lines yesterday....e.g. from System...The child that is not clean and neat, with lots of toys and things to eat, He is a naughty child, I'm sure - Or else his dear papa is poor ! ...or Foreign Children.....Little Indian, Sioux or Crow, Little frosty Eskimo, Little Turk or Japanese O! don't you wish that you were me?....You have curious things to eat, I am fed on proper meat; You must dwell beyond the foam, But I am safe and live at home......extraordinary stuff really....here's some more A Thought...It is very nice to think The world is full of meat and rink, With little children saying grace In every Christian kind of place. I want to remember this one for work.....Good and Bad Children....Children, you are very little, And your bones are very brittle; If you would grow great and stately, You must try to walk sedately....how do you think that will go down in a library today????

whowerethey said...

Do you remember Bed Knobs and Broomsticks? I just remembered it when I saw My Bed is a Boat.

Sharon said...

It is wonderful when other posts bring back forgotten memories. I was reminded of the model boat that my brother had and how my sister and I would sneak it as he wouldn't let us play with it.

Thank you for the memories :)

Bob Scotney said...

The only boats I remember from my childhood were made of paper (and could be used as hats). It was so easy to make one; why can't I do it now.

Tattered and Lost said...

Oh yes, those poems. It's been a long time since I read them. And you now have me wondering what became of my little blue sailboat that I loved to sail down the rain swollen gutters.

diane b said...

I remember those poems and the same picture book. I vaguely remember hammering wood together to make a boat and floating it in the local creek.

TICKLEBEAR said...

Now, you've made your bed, and we get to lay in it!!!
What a fun ride!!
I've always preferred my bed to others
and it's often been the safe haven of this only child.
Loved the books in your pictures,
something we have in common.
:)~
HUGZ

Alex Daw said...

I'm embarrassed to say that I haven't seen this although I have heard of it. It's on the To Do list.

Alex Daw said...

My pleasure Sharon :)

Alex Daw said...

Hi Bob - I hear you. I used to like making those paper fortune telling things..you know the ones with numbers on and then you lifted up the flap and it said something silly.

Alex Daw said...

The tin soldier sailed it out to sea. The boat sank and the soldier was eaten by a big fish. The fish was caught and served up for tea and the toy solider was given to the little boy who ate the fish. The little boy made a paper boat for the tin soldier and ......

Alex Daw said...

Ah the local creek. Where would we be without it?

Alex Daw said...

Always gorgeous to hear from you Ticklebear!