Saturday, August 3, 2013

Sepia Saturday 188: 3 August 2013


Take a look at this 1905 photograph (from the collection of the Library of Congress) of the pier and harbour of the English port of Littlehampton. What you see is a tall ship and a remarkably small lighthouse. Or you might want to focus on the high windmill and the squat little tugboat. So if you want a theme for Sepia Saturday 188 (post your posts on or around Saturday 3 August 2013) you could look for photographs that bring together large and small, or big and little. Or, there again, you could focus on the sea, ships, lighthouse, piers or men leaning against bicycles. As ever with Sepia Saturday, the choice is up to you : all we ask for is an old photo and some new thoughts.


Ouf - what a banquet of choice this week in Sepia Saturday.

I can't focus on anything.

I live in Brisbane so you have to have the obligatory shot of our windmill.

Windmill and flagstaff in Wickham Terrace ca. 1893
I do believe that is a man and his bicycle in the foreground - albeit not leaning - but I'm happy with that coincidence.  Thanks to Picture Queensland for this photo.

Now, to lighthouses.  Well I'm partial to Bustard Head Lighthouse as per this previous post here.  But for good measure, here is a different picture of the lighthouse for your edification.

Lighthouse keeper, M. J. Rooksley at Bustard Head, Queensland, 1902
Ships?  Well this one of the Indus at the South Reach of the Brisbane River also appealed though I can't claim any link to the Indus - well not yet anyway....

Indus (ship) anchored in the South Reach of the Brisbane River, Brisbane, 1876
Last but by no means least, piers.

I have a soft spot for the Redcliffe Pier.  I worked at Redcliffe last year and took this photo.

Redcliffe Pier 2012
Compare it with this old one I found on Picture Queensland.

Entrance to Redcliffe Pier c 1935
There are many fond memories of the Southport Pier in my husband's family memory (not mine unfortunately)

This is how he remembers it in the 1950s.

Southport Pier Theatre, Southport, Queensland, circa 1950 [picture] / Photographer unknown.

We've had a change of advertisers/sponsors and a name for the theatre in this photo...earlier I think, though no date given.  I'm guessing the 1930s.

Pavilion Theatre on the Southport Pier Gold Coast

Here's another view

Southport Pier and theatre viewed from Anzac Park, Southport, Queensland, circa 1940s [picture] / Photographer unknown.

I like the big sign saying Talkies!  

And here's another view from the school which my sisters-in-law used to attend.

Elevated view, from Star of the Sea convent, of Southport Pier and theatre, Southport, Queensland, circa 1930s [picture] / Photographer unknown.

My husband remembers buying a Tristram's soft drink for threepence, back in the day.  He remembers the pier was burned down once in his lifetime, rebuilt and then pulled down because of it being a bit of a fire trap and problems with white ants.  Watching the movies with the sea lapping underneath your feet while lolling about in deck chairs must have been fun.  I remember my step mother telling me that she used to work there as an usher.

My heartfelt thanks to Gold Coast City Council Libraries for most of the photos of the Southport Pier on Picture Gold Coast .  I've spent a few hours this morning trawling their online collection and gathering material for my husband's family history.  It;s well worth drilling down to the local council library level to find lots more images.

Right, now to finish off - big and little things. 

What about this?

Cyclist posing with a penny farthing bicycle

A big bicycle...oh all right, a penny farthing....

And, I love this photo of my mother best of all with a big dog called Pete.

Barbara McLoughlin and Pete circa1939
It's Saturday,!  Relax and mosey on over to my partners in crime at Sepia Saturday and see what's on offer - maybe you could join us too and contribute something.  Go on!

And here's a bit of my favourite music...just because I can



34 comments:

Joan said...

My favorites are your Mom and Pete and of course, the Indus. Good job.

Sharon said...

I agree with Joan. I love the photo of your Mum and Pete. Big enough to ride like a horse?

boundforoz said...

I'm sure everyone just loved Pete. Big enough to ride like a pony :-)

Cassmob (Pauleen) said...

Pete reminds me of my daughter's dog so I love the photo of your Mum with him. Also the reminiscences of Brisbane including our windmill.

Jackie van Bergen said...

Wow, what a difference in the appearance of the pier!
I love that music too - one of my favourites.
i don't know if you read my other blog posts but my post just before this saturday's was about my husband's 'run in' with a unicycle - your penny farthing reminded me.

diane b said...

A great collection to tie in with the theme. Most of the places are familiar to me but I never knew that there was a pier at Southport. Always something to learn by blogging.

Wendy said...

Wow, you hit all the points! I always enjoy visiting lighthouses and hearing the stories of the life of the lighthouse keeper.

Interesting transformation of the Redcliffe Pier.

Karen S. said...

Wow, this was delightful and interesting. I believe you post very well when your thoughts are everywhere! Great photos, so wonderful to share with us.

Mike Brubaker said...

I would imagine lighthouses were very important in Australia given the geography and distance. The photo of your mother and her dog is a priceless treasure.

Alex Daw said...

Dear Joan - that last photo is pretty hard to beat isn't it? I'm glad you like the Indus too.

Alex Daw said...

Dear Sharon - thank you for visiting. I'm amazed she was so relaxed with it. It must have been a very gentle creature.

Alex Daw said...

Indeed!

Alex Daw said...

Yes, the dear old windmill. It's such a part of the landscape I tend to forget that it's still there !

Alex Daw said...

Isn't it amazing Jackie? So glad you like Boardwalk too. I'm off to check your previous post.

Alex Daw said...

Diane - I have heard of the Southport Pier so many times but of course, until I looked it up, had no idea what it looked like. Now it is more real to me and I'm almost missing it even though I never knew it.

Alex Daw said...

Wendy, isn't it an interesting transformation. I thought the current pier looked quite authentic and was surprised to see what it looked like before.

Alex Daw said...

Karen - thank you. I do worry about the scatter gun technique sometimes - you've eased my mind :)

Alex Daw said...

Dear Mike - I agree with your observation. There's a fiction book out at the moment which is proving popular called The Light Between Oceans - I started reading it but then had to return it to the library - but it's about being a lighthouse keeper - amongst other things. Glad you like the photo.

Brett Payne said...

I presume the current Redcliffe Pier building was erected some time in the 1920s/1930s, judging from the Art Deco style. Having grown up in a landlocked country I'm not too familiar with amusement piers, except in old photos, but they look like a lot of fun.

Little Nell said...

A great set of photos and how clever to get a man and his bicycle in that first picture too. Pete is going to be this week's favourite I think.

Kristin said...

I would like to have seen a movie with the sea under the floor.

Boobook said...

Great research Alex. An Australian film with a lighthouse theme is 'South Solitary' - about a remote island off the coast of Tasmania but actually filmed in Victoria at Cape Nelson and Cape Otway lighthouses.

Alex Daw said...

Yes though I do wonder if it is bordering on modernism/fascism in it's style. We need an architectural expert here.

Alex Daw said...

Thanks Little Nell - I was a bit pleased to see that bicycle, I must say. Pete is proving popular isn't he?

Alex Daw said...

Kristin I have been to the Deckchair Cinema in Darwin which is almost as good - watching the sun set over the Indian Ocean before watching a movie in the open air.

Alex Daw said...

Ooh - you've reminded me that I still want to see that movie. Thanks !

Jackie said...

Hello
This is my first visit to sepia Saturday
The photo of the penny farthing reminds me of holidays I had as a child visiting my great auntie and uncle they owned a bike shop in Leighton buzzard but out the back my uncle had a penny farthing he would get out to show us and ride!
Jackie
http://scrapbangwallop.blogspot.com

Bob Scotney said...

Pete is a favourite with me too from the great collection you have shown.

Alex Daw said...

Hi Jackie ! A very warm welcome to Sepia Saturday. I hope you enjoy contributing and reading other contributions as much as I do. I don't think I have ever seen a penny farthing in real life. That must have been pretty special for you. Did you get to ride it or was it just your great uncle?

Alex Daw said...

Blushes and bows - thanks Bob (almost wrote Pete ;))

anyjazz said...

Loved the photograph of the child and the dog. A real treasure.

TICKLEBEAR said...

I prefer the Redcliffe to the Southport as in my view, such places are there to enjoy the view, not to be enclosed within.

But, of course, Pete steals the show here.
Great shot with your mom.
:)~
HUGZ

Alex Daw said...

Thanks Ticklebear...and I agree with you re Redcliffe versus Southport.

Alex Daw said...

Yes, it's a classic :)